Despite the war in Ukraine, Russian gas continues to flow to Europe (infographic)

Despite the desire to introduce new sanctions against Russia, gas continues to be supplied en masse in Europe.

Neither the increasing escalation of the war in Ukraine nor the demand to pay for gas in rubles will affect Europe’s supply of Russian gas for the time being. Russia’s state-owned gas company Gazprom said it intends to transport on Monday 108.3 million cubic meters to Europe via its pipeline in Ukraine after transporting 108.4 million cubic meters on Sunday. Deliveries therefore remain in place close to contractual limits maximum 109 million cubic meters. This high level is partly explained by the low temperatures in Europe. Therefore, the demand for gas is higher.

There was also much confusion over gas supplies last week when Russian President Vladimir Putin called for Russian gas be paid in rubles from April. However, Europe refused.

Despite calls in Europe to impose new sanctions against Russia over atrocities by Russian forces, particularly in the Ukrainian city of Bucha, Gas seems to be exempt these penalties. Russia is Europe’s main supplier of natural gas, and many countries fear their energy supplies will be disrupted if they stop buying Russian gas. Christian Sewing, chief executive of the Association of German Banks (BdB), said on Monday he understood the call for a gas embargo emotionally, but warned that if it comes to that, “it is very likely that the German economy and probably also the European economy into a recession the consequences of which could last for a long time”.

“Not interchangeable,” said Germany

Germany cannot do without “short-term” Russian gas supplies and sanctions against Moscow in this sector would harm the EU more than Russia, German Finance Minister Christian Lindner said on Monday.

“We must consider harsh penaltiesbut in the short term, Russian gas supplies are irreplaceable” and interrupt them “would harm us more than Russia‘ Mr Lindner said in Luxembourg ahead of a meeting with his EU counterparts.

“Austria is not in favor of gas sanctions. It’s us very dependent Russian gas in Austria. Sanctions should not hit us harder than Russia,” said Austrian Finance Minister Magnus Brunner.

Also read: War in Ukraine: Under international law, there are many options for the allies to act

Neither the increasing escalation of the war in Ukraine nor the demand to pay for gas in rubles will affect Europe’s supply of Russian gas for the time being. Russia’s state-owned gas company Gazprom said it plans to ship 108.3 million cubic meters to Europe through its pipeline in Ukraine on Monday, after transporting 108.4 million cubic meters on Sunday. Deliveries remain close to the contractual maximum of 109 million cubic meters. This high level is partly explained by the low temperatures in Europe. Therefore, the demand for gas is higher. There was also much confusion surrounding gas supplies last week, when Russian President Vladimir Putin called for Russian gas to be paid for in rubles from April. However, Europe refused: despite calls in Europe to impose new sanctions on Russia over atrocities committed by Russian forces, particularly in the Ukrainian city of Bucha, gas appears to remain exempt from those sanctions. Russia is Europe’s main supplier of natural gas, and many countries fear their energy supplies will be disrupted if they stop buying Russian gas. Christian Sewing, chief executive of the Association of German Banks (BdB), said on Monday he understood the call for a gas embargo emotionally, but warned that if it comes to that, “it is very likely that the German economy and probably the European economy will too.” Germany could not do without “short-term” Russian gas supplies and sanctions against Moscow in this sector would harm the EU more than Russia, said Federal Finance Minister Christian Lindner on Monday, “are not interchangeable” , and an interruption “would harm us more than Russia,” said Lindner in Luxembourg before a meeting with his EU colleagues. “Austria is not in favor of gas sanctions. We in Austria are very dependent on Russian gas, sanctions must not hit us harder than Russia,” added Austrian Finance Minister Magnus Brunner.

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