Belgian supplies face few threats from Russian gas companies

Rising tensions between Russia and the European Union could weigh on imports of Russian gas from a Europe largely dependent on Russia. But Belgium does not have such a dependency profile, reports L’Echo on Tuesday, citing the network operator Fluxys.

In Belgium, Russian gas is transported by pipeline via the Eynatten connection station, near Verviers, accounts for less than 4% of imports, says Laurent Remy, spokesman for the Fluxys network manager. Including LNG according to trade statistics of the FPS Economy, the share of Russian gas in total was 6.6% in 2020.

Belgium therefore currently has a dependency profile on Russian gas that is very different from that of the European Union as a whole, while European countries typically import around 40% of their natural gas from Russia. Although this profile could change as Belgium has opted for gas to generate electricity to replace nuclear reactors.

With its gas terminal in Zeebrugge and its 18 interconnection points with neighboring countries Belgium is an important logistics platform that could play an important role in the event of a shortage of Russian gas and a diversification of European imports.

The network is by no means saturated, quite the opposite: there is capacity to transport more gas in one direction or the other if required.”says Laurent Remy.

In addition, Fluxys notes in De Tijd that the 200 major Belgian industries that consume gas and are directly connected to the Fluxys network consumed 5% less of it last year in response to the increase in energy prices. Households, on the other hand, consumed more gas, around 14% moredue to low temperatures in the past year, which have pushed up heating consumption.

In Belgium, Russian gas arriving by pipeline via the Eynatten connection station near Verviers accounts for less than 4% of imports, says Laurent Remy, spokesman for grid operator Fluxys. Including LNG, according to the trade statistics of the FPS Economy in 2020, the share of Russian gas accounted for a total of 6.6%. Belgium therefore currently has a Russian gas dependency profile very different from that of the European Union as a whole, while European countries typically import around 40% of their gas from Russia. Although this profile could change as Belgium has opted for gas to generate electricity to replace nuclear reactors. With its gas terminal in Zeebrugge and its 18 interconnection points to neighboring countries, Belgium is an important logistics platform that could play an important role in the event of a shortage of Russian gas and the diversification of European imports. “The network is by no means saturated, on the contrary: there is capacity to transport more gas in one direction or the other if necessary,” says Laurent Remy. In addition, Fluxys notes in De Tijd that the 200 major Belgian industries that consume gas and are directly connected to the Fluxys network consumed 5% less of it last year in response to the increase in energy prices. Households, on the other hand, consumed around 14% more gas last year due to the low temperatures, which pushed up heating consumption.

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